A clothesline extending across a street with brightly coloured shirts

The Top Ten Items I Never Travel Without

I suspect that there is little in this world more subject to personal preferences than what gets packed for an overseas or extended trip. Our individual sense of ‘priority’ is as precisely different as we are.

About now, I suspect a whole bunch of my friends are rolling their eyes as our all-too-infrequent weekends away together, highlight our contrasting packing styles. Me with my small, light, carry-on-style suitcase….and their steamer trunks!

Anyway, here are my top ten bare necessities… Continue reading “The Top Ten Items I Never Travel Without”

Day 40 – FINAL DAY – Via Francigena, La Storta to Roma, 21.2km

Date: Thursday 20 September
Distance covered to Rome: 1046.9km
Terrain: busy roads, forest paths, busy streets
Overnight: Barbineri Luxury Rooms (a very generous description), €72
Feeling: happy and amazed!

When I woke up this morning I could hear the swish of car tyres on the roadway which indicated one thing and one thing only. Rain! It was a bit disappointing, but we weren’t going to let it stop us striding into Rome and doing a happy dance in St Peter’s Square.

Before that we still had a few kilometres to cover and all of them in the drizzle. It was that annoying sort of rain – enough to wet you, but not enough to make you put a rain jacket on. In those situations you are often wetter and hotter in the rain coat than in the rain.

I tried to be an optimist and wish the rain away and eventually, with 5km to go, it worked. We managed to get some hazy photos from Monte Moro and then the real thing in the Square itself.

To be honest I am feeling a bit numb at the moment. I can’t believe I am here and I did it! There were days when I really thought I had bitten off more than I could chew, but I guess you just have to keep putting one foot in front of the other until you reach your goal. How’s that for some mixed metaphors??

Thanks for all your comments, likes and support. It was truly appreciated!

Tip of the day: it is always beer o’clock somewhere in the World!

Hmmmm, now where to next????

(Sorry for the delay in posting. More internet issues!)

Day 39 Via Francigena, Campagnano di Roma to La Storta, 24.7km

Date: Wednesday 19 September
Distance covered to Rome: 1025.7/1027km
Terrain: not what I expected.
Overnight: Hotel Cassia, €55 (Double)
Feeling: excited and amazed that I am almost in Rome.

Today wasn’t what I expected at all. I was thinking that, because we are so close to Rome, we would be subjected to endless industrial estates, road walking and monotonous traffic. Instead I was pleasantly surprised with lots of paddocks, sheep, even more babbling brooks and Etruscan ruins.

The weather forecast for today was rain from 900am so we got an early start in the hope of getting as many kilometres done before the rain set in. Our luck held although it was very humid and sticky and the sweat just poured out of us. Perhaps they should promote this walk as a cleansing process as the pores really get a work out.

A highlight of the day was to see quite a few mobs of sheep being closely guarded by their Maremma dogs. The dogs are so calm and gentle, but I am assuming that would change quickly if the flock was threatened.

You may be thinking, from the distance figure above, that tomorrow I am going to overshoot Rome and start heading south. When I did my original planning I searched the internet for as much information as possible about each stage/leg and selected the longest distance for each stage to develop a ‘worst case scenario’ overall distance. Even with all that, it seems I have underestimated the distance, but what’s 20km between friends?

Here’s to tomorrow!!

Tip of the day: Hang in there! You can do it!

Day 38 Via Francigena, Sutri to Campagnano di Roma, 26.2km

Date: Tuesday 18 September
Distance covered to Rome: 1001/1027km
Terrain: flattish farms and countryside climbs.
Overnight: Centro Parrocchiale, €10 (Donativo)
Feeling: happy to be inside out of the storm.

We survived the festival last night and managed to get some sleep despite the fireworks. We all agreed that the fireworks were more like massive explosions rather than the normal ooh-ahhh fireworks we experience in Australia. The pyrotechnics were showcased at a Roman amphitheatre. I can’t help but wonder about the impact of all that detonation on the ancient structure. It would certainly have shaken the dust out of the rafters!

We have decided that this part of the world is in the commuter belt to Rome. Even at an early hour the roads were super-busy and people seemed to be carpooling to get to work. Thankfully we weren’t on the roads much today and we could stay well out of their way.

The path does seem to be getting busier though and last night we met seven Americans who are just walking the last 100km with baggage transport and hotel accommodation only. Each to their own and perhaps they are way smarter than me!

Olive groves, hazelnut trees of all different ages and stages, and immaculate golf courses that were being pedantically groomed. Eucalyptus trees to remind me of home, gurgling streams and dashing waterfalls, and angry dogs to ensure I don’t get too comfortable.

And then there was the marijuana! Well, I am not an expert by any means, but it looked like a carefully cultivated crop, complete with irrirrigation. Perhaps it was hemp instead? I have noticed in a few towns there are ‘Weed’ shops. Perhaps it is legal in Italy or it is for medicinal purposes only? Or maybe they just don’t inhale?

Tip of the day: If you are walking strongly at this stage of the game, consider combining some of these last days to reduce the number to two or three stages. Accommodation seems to be more plentiful, but so are the number of walkers.

Day 37 Via Francigena, Vetralla to Sutri, 23.1km

Date: Monday 17 September
Distance covered to Rome: 974.8/1027km
Terrain: babbling brooks and forest paths.
Overnight: Hotel Sutrium, €50 (Double)
Feeling: ready to sprint into Rome.

These last few days have been a great way to finish off the via Francigena. The terrain has been relatively kind, the days short and the scenery attractive. Today was no different with lots of forest paths, dappled shade and babbling brooks. Yes, there is the odd unexpected breathtaking climb into or out of a town, but generally the path is more consistently flat.

We were also treated to extensive hazelnut groves (or orchards?). The farmer had hung tonnes of signs warning of poisonous sprays, danger etc etc. I am wondering if this may be a ploy to discourage hungry pilgrims from filling their backpacks with fresh nuts?

We are back into a small 2-star hotel tonight as all the ostello accommodation was booked or closed. At least we get WIFI!

Sutri is a gorgeous little town. We received a royal welcome with celebratory fireworks. Apparently that is just a warm up for tonight’s fiesta, so there may not be much sleep!!

Tip of the day: sometimes you need to ignore both the signs AND the app to get to your destination!

Day 36 Via Francigena, Viterbo to Vetralla, 19.4km

Date: Sunday 16 September
Distance covered to Rome: 951.7/1027km
Terrain: nothing too strenuous.
Overnight: Monasterio Regina Pacis, €25 (DBB)
Feeling: very relaxed.

What a difference it makes to both body and mind when you are only doing short days. I realise 19km is not everyone’s idea of a short day, but in comparison to some I have walked over the past month, it is a breeze.

It was quite unremarkable walking today. The path was intent on keeping us away from towns and cafes, as well as main roads and other asphalt surfaces. It meant there were no coffee stops however we were lucky to score a coffee before leaving the hotel this morning, so we were turbo charged before even stepping out the door.

Olive trees were today’s feature. Lots and lots of very old olive trees marching in rows up and down the hills. The olives themselves seemed to be very small and hard and a conversation ensued about when they are normally harvested. It wouldn’t be much of a harvest at the moment. Can anyone shed any light?

More angry dogs and more farmers out shooting up Sunday with their trusty double-barrel shotguns. Supposed views of the sea lost in the early morning haze and Roman and Etruscan ruins that never appeared.

Hard to believe we will be in Rome in only four short days.

Tip of the day: good conversation makes the walking time fly.

Day 35 Via Francigena, Montefiascone to Viterbo, 18km

Date: Saturday 15 September
Distance covered to Rome: 932.3/1027km
Terrain: mostly flat on back country roads.
Overnight: Hotel Tuscia, €55
Feeling: relaxed.

Our walking party grew to six today with the addition of my husband. It felt a bit strange to see him striding out ahead when I hadn’t seen him for over a month. He quickly ‘got with the programme’ and looked like he had been part of the scenery for the past 34 days.

This morning’s walk was all about the play of the mist. Just when I thought the colours couldn’t get any softer or more muted, the heavy mist added a whole new dimension. The mist also kept the sun at bay and the temperature down, and you have been spared more boring sunrise photos!

The highlight of the day was that our group was adopted by a very friendly and very large white dog. He bounded up to us, across a large paddock, as we were having a breakfast break and was more than happy to receive pats from us all and lead the way as we set off walking again. We walked and walked and the dog trotted along happily doing the usual dog things and checking that we were following. We started to worry that he was going to be a long way from home, but what could we do?

After about 4km a small, rusted out car stopped on the road up ahead and a wizened up old man got out and started yelling. It was hilarious to see the dog’s reaction as you could tell it had been sprung big time by its owner. The dog headed across country, but we were able to lure it back and the old man opened the back door of the car and the dog jumped in with a very sheepish look on its face. Obviously a repeat offender!

The sad news of the day is that we have said goodbye to Thea, Victoria and Mary. They need to skip ahead a bit so that they can catch up with the Pope on Wednesday. They have been fabulous company and it is a real highlight of walks such as these to meet such warm and generous people who are strangers for only a split second before becoming firm friends.

Seeking a cheap hotel in Viterbo we found that they don’t exist. Oh well, it is nice to have a private bathroom and WiFi for a change!

Tip of the day: not every dog in Italy is mean and nasty!

And, happy, happy BIG birthday, Mum!!! Xxx

Day 34 Via Francigena, Bolsena to Montefiascone, 18.5km

Date: Friday 14 September
Distance covered to Rome: 914.3/1027km
Terrain: constant climbs, both big and small.
Overnight: Convento Divini Amore, €15
Feeling: gobsmacked and loved!

None of us wanted to be late this morning as it was our first day walking as a quintet rather than a quartet. We arrived at the designated meeting point early when the girls spotted a bar with its lights on and all thoughts of walking to Montefiascone were postponed until a sufficient amount of caffeine was consumed.

The rest of the morning was completely unremarkable. The path climbed steadily all day, but we were given some lovely glimpses of Bolsena Lake through the trees. The lake is the largest volcanic lake in Europe and covers around 153sq km. Last night we saw fishermen making the most of the sunset and today it was the sailboat’s turn.

We made good time and arrived before it got too hot. After showering and the usual domestics, it was time to track down some lunch. Ross, Mary and I found a small bar in the main square and settled in. After a few minutes Ross got up and said he would be back in a minute and disappeared. Then he returned with a very tall man wearing a backpack.

“And who is this now?”, asks Mary.

“That’s my husband”, said I!!!!!

Yes, can you believe it?? My husband flew all the way from Australia to surprise me and walk the last week with me into Rome! How lucky am I?

For the first (and probably only) time in my life, I was truly speechless!

Tip of the day: never underestimate a man!

Day 33 Via Francigena, Acquapendente to Bolsena, 23.8km

Date: Thursday 13 September
Distance covered to Rome: 895.8/1027km
Terrain: a pleasant stroll through the countryside with water views.
Overnight: Casa di Preghiera Santa Cristina, €11
Feeling: excited with only 7 walking days to go.

None of us got much sleep last night with the rally drivers and motocross riders using the incredibly narrow street outside our window as a race track. How there were no accidents I will never know. You would be taking your life in your hands just stepping out of your front door.

Despite that we were packed and walking by 0529 and again were treated to a breathtaking sunrise. Every morning I tell myself that I am not taking any sunrise photos today, but I just can’t resist. The colours are just so attractive.

Thankfully today was mostly on dirt roads and farm tracks through paddocks and paddocks of potatoes. It was fascinating to watch them being harvested, but we couldn’t understand why they left so many behind. It seemed such a waste to leave the really large and the small ones behind, but maybe it is simply uneconomic to collect them all. More Italian agricultural mysteries!

We left the fields behind and were treated to beautiful views over Lake Bolsena. A massive lake edged with many touristy and holiday towns. It was a grey day today so the tourists weren’t as plentiful and, I understand, the European Summer holidays are now almost over. Back to the grindstone again.

Walking into Bolsena we were greeted by the smiling face of Ross from Sydney. Ross and I are going to walk to Rome, but in the meantime he must also contend with Mary, Thea and Victoria, plus Moi! A very brave man!

Tip of the day: it is better to have Radicofani in the far distance behind you, than in front!

Day 32 Via Francigena, Radicofani to Acquapendente, 25.7km

Date: Wednesday 12 September
Distance covered to Rome: 872/1027km
Terrain: down, down, down, flat, flat, up and up.
Overnight: Casa del Pellegrino San Rocco, €10 (donativo)
Feeling: almost ‘over’ pasta and pizza.

I was feeling a bit doughy this morning when we set off. Normally I seem to refresh overnight, but I guess the big distance, endless climbs and heat took a bit out of me. Perhaps having already walked 872km may have something to do with it too?

Anyway, the legs warmed up soon enough on the big descent from Radicofani.

We seemed to follow series of ridge lines as we descended which gave us a bird’s eye view of the surrounding countryside. Even the farmers were up early and out in their paddocks. Italian farmers must have a strong ticker to maneuver their tractors on such death-defying gradients. Many of the tractors are more like mini bulldozers on tracks (to lower their centre of gravity I am guessing) although some farmers still use the traditional wheeled variety. I am in awe.

A highlight of my day was watching a small fox pup playing on the road. It kept bouncing in and out of the blackberry bushes trying to work out if I was friend or foe. It eventually must have decided I was a rough and ready looking sort and disappeared for good.

Lots of road walking in the last half of the stroll undid some of the enjoyment of the early morning. Oh well, swings and roundabouts.

Tip of the day: when a car drives by and its breeze ruffles the hairs on your legs, it is time to lift your game!

Day 31 Via Francigena, San Quirico d’Orcia to Radicofani, 32km

Date: Tuesday 11 September
Distance covered to Rome: 846.3/1027km
Terrain: OMG! Ascent: 983m, Descent: 612m
Overnight: Rifugio Comunale A Gestri, €16.70
Feeling: Completely stuffed!

Today was the hardest day’s work I have done in a long, long time. Yes there have been some tough days in the last month and today was right up there with best, or worst, of them. The app describes today as ‘ very challenging’. The only ‘ very challenging’ rating in the whole Italian section of the Via Francigena. They were not kidding!

I was climbing soon as I left the streets of San Quirico. It did not augur well for the rest of the day, which turned out to be a series of ever-steeper climbs and finished with the last 8 km of straight up climbing! By this stage, the day was really starting to warm up and it was a real challenge to stay hydrated. Luckily there were some water points along the way, but no food.

I can only imagine what the people in cars and on motor bikes were thinking as they flew past. Yes, another nutter walking the via Francigena!

For a good part of the walk I could not even see my destination, Radicofani. Even though it is located at the top of a mountain, there were equally high mountains in front of it, blocking the view! Yes, I am a nutter!

So, 7 hours and 21 minutes later, I finally made it to Radicofani. No town ever looked so good!

I have shared some photos here from the early part of the day. For the bulk of it, I just didn’t have the energy to drag the camera out of its case.

Tip of the day: skip this section if you can!

Day 30 Via Francigena, Ponte d’Arbia to San Quirico d’Orcia, 27.1km

Date: Monday 10 September
Distance covered to Rome: 814.3/1027km
Terrain: non-stop climbing and only a little descending under Tuscan skies
Overnight: il Palazzo Pellegrini, €10.50
Feeling: like all roads are leading to Rome!

It was a day of ‘girl power’ as Thea, Mary, Victoria and I were up at 430am and out the door before 500am. None of us are fans of walking in the heat and are more than happy to sacrifice a few early hours of sleep for the benefit of walking in the cool.

We walked under cloudless sky which gave us a beautiful view of the stars. For some reason I wasn’t expecting to see many stars over here thinking that there would be too much light pollution and I was proven wrong again.

The terrain today was challenging and we seemed to climb constantly. In reality that is not the case, you have to come down sometime, but that is not what it felt like.

Again we were treated to a dazzling sunrise and the views are enough to make it easy to pause often to catch your breath, guzzle water and mop my brow. This is definitely not a delicate activity!

The path ended with a hefty 3km climb up to yet another hilltop town. I am continually amazed at how they built such substantial towns on such small tracts of land. The simple mechanics of hauling all the stone and timber up such steep inclines just beggars belief. I am in awe.

Tip of the day: directional signs are just as important as the miracle of a bar open at 600am serving coffee and fresh donuts!

Day 29 Via Francigena, Siena to Ponte d’Arbia, 27.2km

Date: Sunday 9 September
Distance covered to Rome: 787.2/1027km
Terrain: endless rolling Tuscan hills
Overnight: Centro Cristi, €10 (donation)
Feeling: happy to have friends again.

I felt rested and strong when I woke up this morning. Obviously the day off the path yesterday did me the world of good. I was packed and gone within about 20 minutes and out onto the streets of Siena.

Once again I was thankful for the app on my phone to help me stay on track through the winding streets. I suspect that, being such a historic city, Siena controls what signs can be erected and consequently there were virtually no via Francigena signs and very few of the red and white stickers that often clearly mark the path.

As you can imagine it was very quiet at 530am on a Sunday morning, except for a few happy drunks singing quietly to themselves. And yet, I could sense I was being followed. I could hear murmuring behind me and I started to form a bit of a plan covering how loud I would yell and scream and whose door I would bang on first. Until I heard “is that you Mel”? Sure enough it was my Irish friends Thea and Mary, and Thea’s daughter, Victoria.

What a happy reunion it was in the pitch black dark! We haven’t seen each for the best part of three weeks and now we are on the path together again. It was lovely to walk and chatter away through and over the rolling Tuscan hills. I was conscious though that we had to keep one eye on the path as it is easy to get so caught up in the conversation and miss a turn or a signpost.

More brilliant views, delicate sunrises and leaping deer. It is all too special for words.

Tip of the day: you can’t beat a friendly face and an Irish lilt!

Day 28 Via Francigena, Colle di Val d’Elsa to Siena, 37km

Date: Friday 7 September
Distance covered to Rome: 760/1027km
Terrain: a bit of everything today including heart-stopping climbs
Overnight: Attilio Camere, $100.50
Feeling: Relieved to have a rest day tomorrow.

There is nothing more disheartening than stepping out of the ostello into the very early morning darkness to be greeted by thunder and lightning. Not the best way to start to the day. On went the pack cover and poncho at the ready. I did get rained on, but it was only for about an hour and it was only light. Yes, you have to look for the upside in these situations.

I walked hard today as I had a lot territory to cover and I hoped to do that before it got really hot. The first 15km was through undulating farm land and I was treated to a spectacular sunrise with the sun coming up directly behind Monteriggioni. Monteriggioni is yet another ionic hilltop town and, believe me, you have to work hard to get there. You cruise along country paths and back roads, and then you turn onto a path that seems almost vertical! That coffee at the top tasted pretty damn good!

From there into Siena it was more country roads and forest paths. I was delighted to see the palest mauve crocus and pink cyclamens growing wild on the forest floor. A splash of colour amongst all the greens and browns.

The path seems to be getting busier as I head south and there were a few other walkers out and about yesterday. As I walked behind one group I couldn’t help but notice that one woman definitely didn’t want to be there. She was moaning continually, dragging her feet and every step was a chore. Why sign up for these things if you aren’t prepared to do the miles? I pity her walking partners having to jolly her along the whole time and to have to slow their own natural walking pace to match hers. It makes it tough for everyone.

Siena looks like an amazing city although it was quite a shock to see so many people and all of them strolling slowing and generally being tourists! I immediately had to adjust my mindset AND my walking pace. Perhaps I will be better at that tomorrow when I am clean and rested!

Tip of the day: supercharge your day with coffee!

(Apologies, I am having email issues again. Can’t access webmail)

Day 27 Via Francigena, Gambassi Terme to Colle di Val d’Elsa , 27.8km

Date: Thursday 6 September
Distance covered to Rome: 723/1027km
Terrain: Beautiful valley floors and many stiff climbs to get out of them!
Overnight: Convento di San Francisco, €10
Feeling: excited that this time in two weeks I will be walking into Rome.

Just when you think these early mornings in Tuscany can’t get any better, this morning I was treated to yet another gorgeous sunrise, but this time accompanied by five hot air balloons floating on the horizon! Talk about a Kodak moment. Unfortunately they were too far away for me to create my own Canon moment, but I enjoyed the spectacle none the less.

And then another doe sprints across my path. I have heard of ‘chick magnets’, but not deer magnets. I think my deer count is up to about seven now. I sat at a restaurant the other day and the waitress was doing her best to explain the menu. She couldn’t think of the English word for venison and instead told me that I could eat Bambi! Not the best marketing spiel I have ever heard!

Today’s path took me through the glorious hilltop town of San Gimignano. It was only just waking up when I walked through, but even then it had a great atmosphere and oozed history. I think I should have planned a lot more rest days to explore all these places or maybe it is a good excuse for a return visit….in a car!

The path also gave me an option of taking a variant from the official via Francigena path, which brought me to Colle in a much more direct and consequently, shorter route. I had aimed to walk 33km today to get to my destination. I hope this means those missing kilometres are not added to tomorrow’s count! Oh well, take it as it comes…

Tip of the day: beware of via Francigena signs giving you the scenic route through a town, rather than the most direct one. App to the rescue!

Day 26 Via Francigena, San Miniato to Gambassi Terme, 24.2km

Date: Wednesday 5 September
Distance covered to Rome: 695.2/1027km
Terrain: rolling Tuscan hills and country back roads
Overnight: Ostello Sigerico, €12
Feeling: hungry and a bit perplexed about the next two days.

So this is what I was expecting! The rolling hills of Tuscany and the many layers of valleys with the hills behind them.

It was stunning walking as the sun rose this morning. Everywhere I turned was yet another amazing view. I am sure my photos won’t do it justice, but I tried to capture the softness of the colours and that layering effect.

The countryside changed from ancient olive groves, to endless grape vines, to more open country and what looked like wheat stubble. I am not sure how they plough and harvest such steep country, but they have obviously been doing it for hundreds of years. Practice makes perfect.

Accompanying me on today’s stroll were about 100 biting flies and they were all determined to have a piece of me! I sorted them out with the RID, but they were persistent buggers. I think they are something like our March flies. Not pleasant.

My other small incident came straight out of the movies. Picture me striding along happily, picture car coming towards me at some pace, picture car driving straight through a largish puddle and making no effort to avoid it. Picture me with cranky face as I wipe off mud and water! It always looks much funnier in the movies…

And now I wait for tonight’s ostello to open. I seem to be getting used to waiting. I have had muesli for lunch as the restaurant that is promoted everywhere in this location, closes on Wednesdays. Bugger.

Tip of the day: carry bug spray! And muesli!

Day 25 Via Francigena, Altopascio to San Miniato, 31.1km

Date: Tuesday 4 September
Distance covered to Rome: 671/1027km
Terrain: mostlying forest paths and country roads
Overnight: Ostello San Miniato, €16
Feeling: like I know what I am doing….sort of!

Ah, what a difference a day makes! Today was much more enjoyable, despite the long distance.

It was the usual haul out of town on tar roads, but within a couple of kilometres it was onto back country roads and forest paths. So much more enjoyable.

The bonus today was that there were lots of interpretative signs explaining the history of the region, the path and the flora. At one stage I was even walking on Roman roads. A sign said that in 1804 this stretch of road was described as ‘appalling’ as carts and carriages would frequently roll over. I bet the same could be said for some of our modern day roads.

Tonight I am staying in a place called San Miniato. I thought my accommodation was in San Miniato Basso (lower), but of course not! I am in San Miniato Alto (high) which meant a huge climb up an equally huge hill! My current challenge, as I write, is to find a bed. I had booked at one ostello, but it looked completely abandoned and no one was there. My gut told me to move on, so now I wait for a much nicer ostello to open their doors….only a five hour wait ahead of me!

And it has started raining again. Oh well, at least it has cooled things down again.

Tip of the day: if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it is probably a duck!

Postscript: all good. I have a bed. Now I need to chase some food!

Day 24 Via Francigena, Lucca to Altopascio, 19.4km

Date: Monday 3 September
Distance covered to Rome: 639.9/1027km
Terrain: Again, too much edge-of-road walking.
Overnight: Comune o biblioteca, €10
Feeling: glad to be off the busy roads

There is not much I can write about today other than it was gloriously short!

The path seemed to stick to roads and streets the whole way and most of them were busy. There were a couple of short stretches through the fields to escape the traffic, but they didn’t last long. I have been surprised by the amount of road walking on this route. For some reason I assumed it would be more rural or cross-country. Maybe the few stretches I did in the north are all I am going to get.

At least it was cool and overcast the whole walk. Perhaps this is the start of Autumn?

My big news for the day is that tonight I am sharing a room with a lady from Canowindra! Talk about small world!

Tip of the day: just because there are walkers ahead doesn’t mean they know where they are going. Follow your own directions!

Day 23 Via Francigena, Pietrasanta to Lucca, 30.5km

Date: Saturday 1 September
Distance covered to Rome: 620.5/1027km
Terrain: Too much edge-of-road walking.
Overnight: Mimi Apartment, €72.50
Feeling: Happy to have a rest day tomorrow.

This morning I woke up at 200am thinking, “gee, it’s windy outside”. Then the penny dropped that it wasn’t wind, it was teeming rain! Uh oh!

It had eased dramatically when I made a start on the day, but I didn’t get fair without stopping to put my rain poncho on. Two kilometres down the road and it was teeming again and I had to make a call whether to walk back to Pietrasanta and catch a bus or train to Lucca, or push on. As the rain eased again, the optimist in me won out and now with my gaiters on, I set off up the road.

There was a lot of road walking today, and while it is fine when there isn’t much traffic, it’s not fun when the cars and trucks are coming thick and fast.

The grey clouds hung around all morning and then they started to be acccompanied by thunder and then lightning….and then bucketing rain. Now this is definitely the definition of un-fun!

I determinedly pushed on convincing myself that every step was a step closer to Lucca until the thunder and lightning seemed to be getting closer AND it started to HAIL! That was the last straw! By this stage I was sheltering in a motorbike shop and the lovely man called me a taxi. The best damn €15 I have ever spent!!

So, I missed out on 4km, but much better that than drowning, being fried by lightning or flattened by a truck. Yes, I have come to wisdom late!

Tip of the day: you can’t out walk an Italian storm!

Day 22 Via Francigena, Avenza to Pietrasanta, 31km

Date: Friday 31 August
Distance covered to Rome: 590/1027km
Terrain: two stiff climbs and the rest doable.
Overnight: Casa Diocesana La Rocca, €10
Feeling: Tired, but surprisingly OK.

I was interested to see how the body pulled up this morning after such a big day yesterday. Other than being a bit tired, my legs were OK and ready to face another day. The good news is I only have another two +30km days to do over the next 18 days. Or perhaps I should just add here ‘that I know of’!

As I walked out of Avenza this morning I was teased with the perfume of freshly baked croissants! How cruel, but delicious at the same time. These sorts of walks really engage all the senses and smell is an important one. Yesterday it was the scent of apples as I walked past some orchards and then later today it was the smell of grapes being processed. There are also plenty of stinky smells I would prefer to avoid and I won’t plague you with them here.

All day today it was the sea on my right (about 10km away) and grape vines terraced up to the sky on my left. Another engineering masterpiece and would give the grape pickers a serious workout!

The region is also marble country – think Carrara marble. I haven’t walked through Carrara, but it is not far away. I was fascinated to walk past many industrial yards with marble blocks and slabs aplenty. I even saw a machine in the process of slicing a block into slabs. Yes, I know I am easily amused!

Just resting the legs now and then later I will head out to explore. Pietransanta looks like an amazing town with oodles of street art and sculpture.

Tip of the day: walk with all your senses.

Day 21 Via Francigena, Aulla to Avenza, 35.9km

Date: Thursday 30 August
Distance covered to Rome: 559/1027km
Terrain: Hard climbs and descents and endless flat.
Overnight: Parrochia San Pietro Apostela, €10
Feeling: Beat!

Phew! What a day!

I wasn’t expecting today to be quite so long. The schedule said 33km, but the reality was quite different. In the scheme of things 3km isn’t much, but at the end of a long day, it can seem massive.

Way back when I was working out the plan for this trip, I thought it would be possible to combine a couple of days. How hard could that be? (See commentary on Day 1)

What I didn’t understand at that stage was that their definition of flat and MY definition of flat could be quite different. I also didn’t understand their relaxed attitude to distances – give or take 3-5km!

So today, as well as walking the ‘challenging’ 17km stage, I thought I would tack on 16km of flat. However their flat involved near vertical climbs out of towns and innumerable ups and downs. Go figure!?

The good news is that I saw the sea today and apparently I am quite close to the resort town of La Spezia. Now there is temptation, right there!

As you can see by the photos, the views continue to amaze. I saw so many hilltop towns today and I took photos of almost every one. I am sure the novelty will wear off, but I am loving them all at the moment.

Tip of the day: when it is thundering, the power of positive thinking is pretty useless.

Day 20 Via Francigena, Pontremoli to Aulla, 33.1km

Date: Wednesday 29 August
Distance covered to Rome: 523.1/1027km
Terrain: Mixed. Busy roads and forest paths.
Overnight: Ostello di San Caprasio, €10
Feeling: Excited!!! Over half way now.

You would think that with all this fresh air and exercise I would be sleeping like a log, but No. I toss and turn for hours and then am awake at 400am! Maybe it is the pure excitement of another +30km day! Not!

More edge-of-road walking to start the day. It is not pleasant, but at least there is little traffic at that time of day. Once that was done, it was really pretty walking. I spent most of the day on small back roads and country lanes. The lanes were often lined with old, old rock walls, now covered in moss. Most of the walls are in a pretty sad state and no one seems to bother maintaining them anymore. That’s a bit sad as I can imagine what an important part those lanes played in the past. These tracks would have been the links between all the small villages, like little communication lines.

The disappointing thing is that some people think these lanes are their own personal garbage dump. I was about 500m down one lane and there were all these large plastic bags full of bottles and cans. Why?? Why not walk to the closest recycling bin or simply put them out on collection day? They do seem to have an active recycling programme over here, which makes it even more confusing. I just don’t get it.

After 33km I was desperate for a shower and to pull my boots off, but the ostello was closed until 3pm! That is heartbreaking for a sweaty walker, but those are the hours that most Italians keep (900am-1230pm, 300pm-700pm). It takes a bit of getting used to and understanding which shops and bars will be open and when. First World problem!

Tip of the day: ear plugs are essential when you are sleeping next to the church bells.