The Museum of Old + New Art as a Work of Art Itself, Hobart Tasmania

Internal tunnels at MONA Hobart TasmaniaNot only does David Walsh’s Museum of Old + New Art contain a stunning collection of beautiful, clever, witty and sometimes shocking artworks, it is also an architectural masterpiece in its own right.

Its imposing façade is full of strong steel and rugged sandstone contrasts neatly with plantings of hardy native plants.

Let’s have a look…

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Remembering the Fallen – The Last Post Ceremony at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra

An image of the Australian War Memorial with a red poppy laying across the imageOn the 25th of April every year, Australia pauses to commemorate ANZAC Day. This day takes the form of memorial services at the Cenotaph in every small town and village across the country, with very large and well-supported parades in our major cities.

An important part of the annual ceremony is the playing of The Last Post. A haunting bugle solo that never fails to bring chills and goose bumps.

Unlike once-a-year ANZAC Day, The Last Post Ceremony at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra is held every afternoon and, in my humble opinion, it is a must-do activity for every Aussie.

I had heard a little about the Last Post Ceremony at the Australian War Memorial (AWM) and when planning a visit to Canberra, it was high on my list of things to do. Unfortunately, even though I was booking two weeks ahead, it was already booked out. Bugger!

IMG_6286Booking tickets prior to visiting is now required for all parts of the AWM. I even rang the AWM to see if I could beg a ticket, but no joy and they advised that we would just have try to our luck on the day. Oh well, not to worry. There would be plenty of other things to see and do.

After three hours of military history, death, destruction and a few small doses of humour we were just about overwhelmed with the whole AWM experience. As we headed across the empty grounds and towards the carpark, it was nearing the time of the Last Post Ceremony, and I suggested to The Husband that we should try our luck and check if they could squeeze us in.

We were rewarded with a warm welcome and ushered back through the doors of the main AWM building and into the Commemorative Area.

The Roll of Honour at the Australian War Memorial with thousands of red poppiesThe Commemorative Area is often seen in promotional images for the AWM. It is a large open courtyard with a ‘pool of reflection’ running lengthways along the courtyard floor and overlooked by two long, arched verandas. These verandas are home to a seemingly endless Roll of Honour listing the names of 102 000 soldiers and service people who represented Australia and lost their lives in over 100 years of conflict. It was incredibly sobering to walk and read the names knowing that each bronze name represents a heartbeat and a life cut far too short.

Where the bronze alphabetical panels join each other there is small crack and friends and family are welcome to insert a small poppy next to the name of the person who is significant to them. The scarlet poppies add a brilliant flash of colour amongst the sadness.

The Roll of Honour at the Australian War Memorial with thousands of red poppiesAs we slowly walked and read, letting the sheer volume of names sink in, I noticed a lady in tears as she tried to explain to her young son the seriousness and significance of all the poppies. I dug into the bottom of my handbag and gave her a packet of tissues. Probably not a 100% Covid19-safe action, but she appreciated it.

But, back to the Last Post Ceremony…

The Last Post Ceremony is the final activity held at the AWM before the close of each day and it is both solemn and powerful. I am getting goose bumps just writing about it many weeks later.

Laying wreaths at the Australian War Memorial
Wreath layers line up.

The light was fading and the air was taking on that early evening cool that gets into your bones as a respectful hush fell over the small (and well-spaced) crowd. The Master of Ceremonies stepped up to the podium, welcomed us all and acknowledged any returned service people in the audience.

Four wreaths were then laid at the end of the pool of reflection and a bagpiper accompanied the laying of the wreaths. Love ‘em or hate ‘em, bagpipes have a plaintiveness about them that makes everyone pause.

Private William Charles Pinneger Brown
Private William Charles Pinneger Brown. Source: www1cemeteries.com

Colonel Frank Colley saluted and read out the story of Private William Charles Pinneger Brown. At each Last Post Ceremony a service person’s life is featured, bringing an immediate human touch to the event and ensures the audience focuses on the people of the war, rather than the guns, tanks and planes.

Private William Charles Pinneger Brown was born in 1885 in Adelaide, South Australia. Before enlisting in the 10th battalion of the Australian Imperial Force in May 1916, he was a carpenter, married to Ethel with a couple of young children. In December 1916 he joined the 27th battalion in the trenches of France, only to be killed a little over four months later by an artillery shell. He was only 31 years old. Although it was recorded that he died at Bullecourt, his grave has never been located due to the tumult of a moving battlefront and destruction caused by constant bombardment.

Private Brown was one 62 000 Australians who died during World War 1. That’s a pretty powerful number when you consider that Australia’s population in 1918 (by the end of the War) was only around 4.9million. A further 156 000 people were wounded, gassed or taken prisoner during the war.

The Ceremony then moved on the Ode. The Ode comes from For the Fallen, a poem by the English poet and writer Laurence Binyon.

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

A wreath is placed in front of the Pool of Reflection at the Australian War MemorialYou could have heard a pin drop…except for a pair of larrikin white cockatoos who chose that moment to dive bomb the ceremony and generally create a raucous racket, screeching and squawking as they wheeled above our heads. I couldn’t help but smile at the Australianess of this and our endless desire to poke fun and not take ourselves too seriously. (I note that in the YouTube clip of this ceremony, the cockatoos have been completely edited out!)

A lone bugler stood to attention at the edge of the courtyard and played the forlorn Last Post. A moving and fitting end to the Ceremony. As the last echoes resounded around the verandas, the piper and dignitaries turned and walked into the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the doors closed solemnly behind them.

What a powerful way to end a visit to the AWM.

A photo of Private Brown stands at the end of the Pool of Reflection at the Australian War Memorial
A photo of Private Brown stands at the end of the Pool of Reflection.

Maybe war and military history is not your thing and I understand that completely. Can I recommend that you skip all the displays and body counts, touch screens and dioramas in the AWM itself, and just attend the Last Post Ceremony?

It is a must-do activity and a fitting way to remember those who have served our country – past AND present.

Lest we forget.

 

The Basics

What: It is possible to have your own family member recognised at the Last Post Ceremony. Simply lodge a request on their website. Be prepared to wait though, as it may take up to three years for your soldier’s turn to come around. You can also lay a wreath during the Ceremony itself. When you arrive, see one of the ushers and they will tell you whether all the positions have been filled. You do not need to be a family member to participate and they provide the wreaths.

Where: Treloar Crescent, Campbell (a suburb of Canberra).

A bagpiper at the Australian War MemorialWhen: The Ceremony runs for around 20 minutes and starts at 455pm. Book your ticket here.

Why: To pay homage to those who made it possible for us to live in freedom and in peace.

How: We stayed at the Quest City Walk right in the heart of Canberra. The location was perfect with easy walking distance to lots of restaurants and shops. We booked via AirBnB and at $139, it was very good value. (As an Airbnb Associate, I earn a small commission when you book through this link and it doesn’t cost you anything extra.)

Who: All Australians – young and old.

Related Posts: For more information about what else to see at the AWM. Read on.

Related Blogs: If you can’t make it in person to Canberra, then watch the Last Post Ceremony broadcast live everyday on the AWM YouTube channel or Facebook page.

Read About It: For an interesting and heart-breaking read about a soldier in World War 1, grab a copy of Crack Hardy by Stephen Dando-Collins. The story relates to Dando-Collins’ great uncles who enlisted in WW1 and none were unchanged by the experience. Highly recommended. Go straight to Book Depository.

The Roll of Honour at the Australian War Memorial with thousands of red poppies

#canberra #travelinspo #anzac #australianwarmemorial #worldwarone #thelastpost  #militaryhistory #rememberance #redpoppies

Finding Yourself When You Are Lost in Nature

Book Title: Bewildered

Author: Laura Waters

The cover of the book BewilderedPromotional Blurb: What would move you to ditch your life and take off into the wild for five months? For Laura Waters, it took the implosion of a toxic relationship and a crippling bout of anxiety.

 Armed with maps, a compass and her life in a bag on her back, she set out to walk the untamed landscapes of the Te Araroa trail in New Zealand, 3000 kilometres of raw, wild, mountainous trail winding from the top of the North Island to the frosty tip of the South Island. But when her walking partner dropped out on the second day, she was faced with a choice: abandon the journey, or face her fears and continue on alone? She chose to walk on.

 For five months, Laura battled not only treacherous terrain and elements, but also the demons of self-doubt and anxiety. As the kilometres fell behind her, nature did its work, stripping away her identity and guiding her towards a new way of being. At the end of Te Araroa, it was the hard-earned insights into the power of nature, emotional wellbeing and fulfilling relationships – with others as well as with herself – that were Laura’s greatest accomplishments. She emerged ‘rewilded’, and it transformed her life. Source 

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The Human Side of Mona, Hobart Tasmania

The artworks and art installations at the Museum of Old + New Art (Mona) are as varied as they are clever and shocking.

Modern Art may not be everyone’s art of choice, but it is pretty darn fascinating to think that a human brain can generate such wild and thought-provoking pieces.

In this post, mostly photos, I want to share the people of Mona including some examples of how humans, and their bodily functions, are represented in art.

Beware: there are some images below which may cause offence.

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The Australian War Memorial, Canberra: Celebration, Commemoration or Glorification of War?

With the whole Covid19 kerfuffle severely clipping my international-travel wings, a good alternate travel fix is to explore my own backyard and sights and sites last visited 40 years ago.

What possibly could have changed in that time?

While trying to recover from the shock of 40 years passing in the blink of an eye, I plotted out a break-neck-speed itinerary to visit Canberra in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT).

A group of high school students visit Canberra in 1980
Back in the good ol’ days of school excursions…

For the uninitiated, Canberra is the political capital of Australia and the seat of our Federal Parliament. Every school student in Australia, often during high school, is encouraged to make the pilgrimage to this political and bureaucratic mecca. Thankfully there are many more interesting things to see than just watching our politicians grandstanding during Question Time and as I planned our itinerary, I was determined to revisit a couple of places from my own (ancient) school excursion.

First stop, the Australian War Memorial.

A plinth with Lest We Forget carved into it at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra

Walking past military sculptures and memorial plaques, and up to the imposing façade of the Australian War Memorial, I knew I was in for a war inundation. I enjoy history and I especially enjoy learning about the times, and lives, of people who made our country what it is today. For better or worse, war leaves no place and no one untouched, even when those wars are far from our shores.

In front of the large ‘Fully Booked’ signs, the ushers were turning away tonnes of people and I was a tiny bit pleased that I had booked our tickets well in advance. The Memorial was all over the new normal Covid19 regulations with plenty of hand sanitising stations, additional ushers encouraging social distancing and handing out free stylus’ so you didn’t have to touch the touch-screens to access information.

A World War 1 soldier salutes

After a quick stroll along the balconies of the Commemorative Area, we wandered into the Museum proper and straight into World War 1. World War 1 is a significant focus of this complex as the concept of an Australian war memorial developed straight after the war’s end in 1918. Charles Bean, a war correspondent and historian during World War 1, lobbied hard when he returned to Australia for some sort of memorial to act as a shrine to the memory of the men and women who served.

World War 1 was also especially significant because it was the first war our country fought as a federated nation. Australians did actively participate in the Boer War and other wars, but the First World War was the earliest call of the Mother Country (Great Britain) to defend democracy.

Old diorama models of a Gallipoli battle in World War 1
Old fashioned model dioramas have been retained to show how history used to be communicated

As I strolled the various displays I realised a LOT has changed over the past 40 years and many of the stiff and clumsy diorama models (cutting edge in their day) had been replaced or complemented by sound/light shows, touch screens and tactile displays. Far more appealing and interesting for school students and general visitors of any age!

From World War 1 we stumbled into the more modern wars of Vietnam, Korea, Afghanistan, Iraq and East Timor (more of a peace-keeping mission than a war) before finally moving into the large display of World War 2 machinery and memorabilia. Yes, the lack of chronological order will not please the Purists.

A display from the Vietnam War at the Australian War Memorial Canberra
leaping into the Vietnam War

There is no way you could see everything and read every description in your allotted two hours. I was very interested, but admit to becoming quickly overwhelmed by all the different dates and battles. I love the history, but do not love the equipment of war and the endless guns and tanks and planes leave me cold. I guess I am more interested in the human stories of both those who went to war and those who were left at home.

Soon our time slot was up and we were invited to leave the Galleries in the main building. No one was forcing us out, but we had to leave to make space for others to come in. Last stop was the extensive souvenir shop. If you hadn’t had enough war in the past two hours, you could buy some to take home. A poppy and a postcard were enough for me.

Australian War Memorial - Postcard promoting the RAAF

But we weren’t done yet…

In my flurry of organisation, I had also booked us in to the Anzac Hall, found behind the main War Memorial building. This is a smaller space with a focus on audio-visual shows. They have three presentations:

  • G for George: About WW2 bombing raids over Germany
  • An aerial dogfight from WW1,and
  • Submarines sneaking into Sydney Harbour during WW2.

But I was done. I was all worn and warred out.

Standing on hard surfaces for three house straight was exhausting and my brain was full-to-overflowing with dates, battles, body counts and questionable leadership activities. Perhaps if you lived in Canberra you could make multiple short visits and ‘do’ one war at a time. That way you would have time to process the who, what, where and when. I wouldn’t bother trying to work out the ‘why’.

A soldier from World War 1 - Australian War Memorial
What those eyes would have seen…

I walked away from the Australian War Memorial in the early evening dark impressed by what I had seen, but shaking my head at:

  • The devastation and senselessness of war.
  • The unnecessary cruelty and barbarity of some people during wartime when they put aside any sense of shared humanity.
  • The fact that no one really wins. Everyone is hurt in some way or other. Even the victors pay a high price.
  • Do we really learn from places like the Australian War Memorial? Does it, even in the smallest way, stop us from doing it all over again?
  • Or do we simply say ‘how sad’ and step back into the comfort of our freedoms and democracy, and do it all again?

The Australian War Memorial is lobbying hard for a $498million redevelopment and expansion. I wonder, is that really necessary? Don’t we already have enough in place to honour the memory of the brave?

What do you think? Commemoration? Or Glorification?

An Australian recruiting poster from World War 1

The Basics

What: The Australian War Memorial has three main areas to visit: The Galleries, Commemorative Area and Anzac Hall. It has extensive landscaped grounds with sculpture, memorials, military equipment and a coffee shop. Entry is free.

Where: Treloar Crescent, Campbell (a suburb of Canberra).

When: Open from 10am-5pm, every day except Christmas Day. We visited during Covid19 and it’s now a requirement to book your tickets to the different areas in advance. Book in here.

A kangaroo as a military mascot in Egypt in World War 1
How did they get a kangaroo to Egypt in WW1? Mena Camp outside Cairo.

Why: For ordinary people like me, the ‘why’ is to understand more about Australia’s involvement in a whole range of wars, as well as commemorate the service and sacrifice of others. For the military buffs, the Australian War Memorial would be like having all your Christmases come at once.

How: We stayed at the Quest City Walk right in the heart of Canberra. The location was perfect with easy walking distance to lots of restaurants and shops. We booked via AirBnB. (As an Airbnb Associate, I earn a small commission when you book through this link and it doesn’t cost you anything extra.)

Who: The Galleries appeared to be highly accessible for everyone. There are stairs up to the Commemorative verandas, but perhaps there is a lift somewhere – which I didn’t see. Their website is not clear on physical access.

An Australian Indigenous soldier in World War 1
An Australian Indigenous soldier in World War 1

Related Posts: For a little more military history, but on foreign soil this time, read about our visit to the Pearl Harbour Memorial in Hawaii. An amazing site.

Related Blogs: For another person’s perspective on the Australian War Memorial, have a look at Why You Wander blog. She visited pre-Covid19 and mentioned the availability of guided tours. That would be an excellent activity.

Read About It: For an interesting and eye-opening read, grab a copy of Well Done, Those Men by Barry Heard. He talks about his experience in the Vietnam War and massive personal repercussions afterwards. I never really knew much about the Vietnam War and how the soldiers were treated when they got back to Australia and this book, with some gentle humour in places, explains a lot. Highly recommended. Go straight to Book Depository.

Some of the 1 787 Australian men who were killed at Sandakan, North Borneo in WW2.
Some of the 1 787 Australian men who were killed at Sandakan, North Borneo in WW2.

#canberra #travelinspo #anzac #australianwarmemorial #worldwarone #worldwartwo  #militaryhistory #wartimeheritage

Movie Review: Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago – Does it Really Show What it is Like to Walk a Camino?

A person admiring the view over the Pyrenees. Source: People walking the camino. Source: caminodocumentary.org
Source: caminodocumentary.org

It is time for me to don the black skivvy, slide on the intellectual-looking glasses, and assume my movie-reviewer persona. Definitely not a hard transition to make when today’s movie review relates to walking a camino in Spain.

 Grab a cuppa and a couple of chocolate biscuits (you’ll need some energy for all that walking).

Pull up your comfy chair, sit back and relax, and step out into the Spanish countryside….

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“That’s Your Bloomin’ Lot” – A Visit to the Tasmanian Community Food Garden

Blooming artichokes at Tasmanian Community Food GardenFriday night free-to-air television viewing in Australia features the usual reality TV shows, football or cricket matches (depending on the season) and endless repeats of American sitcoms and B-grade movies. The only bright spot for the horticulturally-inclined is Gardening Australia on ABC TV.

I do admit to finding these and other home/lifestyle shows to be incredibly frustrating as everything is so effortless and perfect. I can assure you there is nothing perfect about my house and garden and it takes a fair bit of effort to even achieve an imperfect state.

Despite that, I do admire the conversation generated by Gardening Australia, especially around the importance of backyard vegetable gardens and fruit orchards. Hence my desire to visit Pete’s Patch, also known as the Tasmanian Community Food Garden, at the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens.

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5 Gorgeous YouTube Clips to Inspire You to Walk a Camino in Spain

A brass shell inlaid in the footpath on the Camino FrancesWe have had a lot of time this year to sit back and think about our lives and how we may live them differently in the future. My wanderlust remains strong and once bans are lifted and it is safe, the first thing I will be doing will be to book my ticket to Madrid, Spain.

Here are five YouTube clips that I hope will communicate the joy of walking in Spain, the wonderful people you meet along the way and the sheer pleasure of being outside in Nature.

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A Deeper, Dustier Visit to Silverton, Outback NSW.

I have enjoyed a couple of work-related flying visits to the iconic outback village of Silverton and when the opportunity arose to return as a ‘proper’ tourist, I couldn’t resist.

Even though Silverton is tiny and officially in the Middle of Nowhere, it delivers history, scenery and serenity in spades.

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The Camino Story. What’s it all about?

A tile representing the shell logo of camino de santiagoThe popularity of walking a camino has gone through the roof over the past five years or so.

What is it, you may ask, and what is the attraction?

In this post I want to tell the camino story. The Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of the crazy passion for tying on your walking shoes, pulling on a backpack and strolling across Spain.

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A Wild and Wonderful Boat Ride Down the Tasman Coastline

I know boat trips and cruises aren’t everyone’s thing, but in my humble opinion, there is no better way to blow the cobwebs out than to scoot down the stunning Tasman coastline, with the sea air pummelling your senses under sparkling blue skies.

Come with me as I step aboard a Pennicott Wilderness Journeys boat for a truly remarkable day out.

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The How, What, When, and Why of Walking the Italian Via Francigena

A large bronze sculpture of a horse in Piacenza
Sculpture, Italian-style…

I was tempted to call this post “All You Need to Know About Walking the Italian Via Francigena”. However as we are all individuals, no doubt we all have quite different experiences of walking 1000km through Italy. Instead, this post has a more modest title.

Modesty aside, what I hope this post does achieve is a comprehensive summary of the planning, the actual experience on a day-to-day basis, and then the obligatory post-walk reflections. I also hope it saves you a bit of legwork as you tackle you own planning.

Ciao…

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A Quick Trip to Macquarie Island, Antarctic Region

Apologies. That is a very deceptive title.

I wish I had enjoyed a quick trip to the snowy Antarctic.

Instead, I stepped through a set of vacuum-sealed doors into the fascinating Subantarctic Plant House at the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens.

I don’t know about you, but when I picture subantarctic anything the last thing I think about is plant life. All I imagine is endless snow, blasting wind and horizontal sleet. But, No.

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Fat, Fifty & Flabby? How fit do you have to be to walk a Camino in Spain?

A long, straight road on the camino via de la plata in Spain
A long hot road on the camino Via de la Plata

There’s a whole lot of mythology out there about walking a camino in Spain.

To you, it may appear to be an attractive romantic notion – out there strolling across the Spanish countryside, breathing in that fresh country air and restoring yourself at the end of each day with copious quantities of vino tinto.

It may also seem to be something well out of your comfort zone and far above your fitness levels.

But, No!

This post will remove some of the mystique and hopefully a few barriers stopping you lacing up your walking shoes and joining the friendly flow of folk on their way to Santiago de Compostela.

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Everything You Need to Know About Mona, Hobart Tasmania

Art at MONA, Hobart TasmaniaLove it or hate it the Museum of Old + New Art, affectionately known as Mona, is a must-see.

It is shocking.

It is thought-provoking.

It makes you smile and grimace in equal parts, and it’s a mind boggling inclusion in any visit to Tasmania.

Here are the nuts of bolts of how to make the most of Mona…

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Movie Review: The Way – Does it Really Show What it is Like to Walk a Camino?

Silhouette of a bull against a cloudy blue sky in Spain
Only in Spain…

It took a particularly wet and miserable Autumn day to keep me inside. As a rule I love rainy days as they happen so rarely in Australia and it was the perfect excuse to dust off my well-loved copy of the movie, The Way.

I put my hand up and admit that this is possibly my sixth or seventh viewing of The Way so obviously I am a bit of a fan. It never fails to create a sense of wanderlust and the urge to walk out my back door and just keep going.

But, how accurate is it? Does it really portray the highs and lows of walking the Camino Frances to Santiago de Compostela in north-west Spain? Or is it all glossed over with a thick layer of Hollywood schmaltz?

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“We’re Here for the Beer” – Research at the Cascade Brewery Co, Hobart Tasmania

I need to be clear from the outset that I am prepared to go to any lengths to research interesting places for you, dear Reader.

If that means learning the finer points of beer-making and then tasting the output, I am definitely ready to put in the hard yards.

It may be early in the day here, but somewhere in the World it is a very appropriate beverage time to step through the doors of the historic Cascade Brewery in Hobart.

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Walking through history in Broken Hill

When visiting Outback Australia on the cusp of Summer, it pays to get outside early and then disappear inside under an air conditioner for the rest of the day.

That was our plan when we signed up for the Broken Hill Heritage Walk Tour.

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Bringing History to Life – the Cascades Female Factory, Hobart

History sometimes earns the reputation of being dry, dull and boring. I put my hand up as a bit of a history-lover so I tend to look for everything good in any history talk or presentation.

You certainly don’t have to worry about being bored when you take part in the Her Story presentation at the Cascades Female Factory in Hobart.

Walk with me and Mary James and listen to her story…

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5 Walking Books to Inspire You to Pull on Your Backpack and Walk Out the Front Door

Just because we can’t physically travel at the moment doesn’t mean we stop dreaming of travel and planning our next adventure.

What it does mean is that we can walk in the footsteps of others, all from the safety and comfort of our cosy armchair.

Here are five tantalising travel books to inspire and deliver a solid case of both envy and admiration.

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Why Go to White Cliffs?

A very good question and one I asked myself continually during our 17-hour visit.

White Cliffs, in Outback NSW, is located approximately 1 020km West of Sydney and 268km North East of Broken Hill. When we jumped in the car in Broken Hill to head towards our destination it was already 34°C and leapt to 38°C in three minutes and it was only 938am!

We were in for a long day…

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Salamanca Market, Hobart – Shop ‘til you drop!

Freshest Tasmanian apples at the Salamanca MarketsWhen you are heading down Hobart way, there are at least two must-see places:

  1. Museum of Old and New Art (MONA) and
  2. Salamanca Market.

Salamanca is an area set slightly back from Hobart’s waterfront and wharf area. Its backdrop is a row of stunning old sandstone warehouses and on Saturday mornings, the foreground is chockful of market stalls.

Feel like a piece of chewy biltong? Want to buy some new socks?

Or how about a taste of the freshest and sweetest natural honey?

Then get yourself to the Salamanca Market

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How to Travel When You Can’t

A cancelled sign for flights
Source: forbes.com

Like millions of other people around the World, I have had my travel wings severely clipped. By now I should be regaling you with stories about our Everest Base Camp adventure and dazzling you with photos of snow-capped mountains and breathtaking valleys. But, all our gear has been packed away, ready to walk another day.

I am the first to agree that my inability to travel is very much a ‘First World’ problem and there are millions of people around the Globe who have much more urgent and important issues to deal with.

Personally, travel brings me such joy and fulfilment that I do genuinely feel its loss and so I have decided that if I can’t travel physically, then I need to find a whole range of ways to travel mentally and emotionally.

Care to join me?

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Review: Free Walking Tour, Hobart

Our guide’s jeans were ripped and torn, and her eye shadow matched the hot-pink of her t-shirt. The fact that the fly of her torn jeans was completely open also did not add to her credibility.

What had we got ourselves into?

At least it was a gorgeous, blue sky day to set out to explore the streets of historic Hobart.

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Green Thumb Inspiration in Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens, Hobart

A wooden sculpture of a man with a hoe at the Royal Tasmanian Botanical GardensI am a bit partial to wanders through lush, green spaces and nothing fits the bill better than a visit to the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens on the edge of the Hobart CBD.

The gardens are one of Australia’s oldest, established in the early years of the colony over 200 years ago. While it may not be the size and scale of more famous gardens, it has a variety and beauty that makes for a very enjoyable couple of hours or a longer day out.

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My Mountain Climbing Career is on hold

Like so many other people, my travel plans have been affected by the virus that is currently sweeping the World.

In a few short days I was to be lacing on my hiking boots and taking my first few tentative steps in the Himalayas, Nepal. But not anymore.

A meme commenting on How little we needThe backpacks have been unpacked and put away, and all the medicines and bits and pieces stored in a separate tub in the hope that the trip will be rescheduled one day. Ever the optimist.

While I am very disappointed, it is time to be a bit philosophical and grateful for all that I do have – a full belly, clothes on my back, a roof over my head, loving family and good friends. Many people don’t even have that.

So in the meantime I will focus on sharing my travels around Australia and have everything crossed that my next camino in Spain, scheduled for early May, comes off.

Take care everyone and stay safe. Melx

 

Get Your Rainbow On in Outback Australia

When you think of Outback Australia, you may think of wide open spaces, searing heat, endless miles of nothingness and dust. Lots of dust.

What may not immediately spring to mind is big hair, sparkly sequins and endless rainbows of feather boas.

That’s until you step through the front door of The Palace Hotel in Broken Hill.

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Packing for Everest Base Camp – Must-Haves vs Luxuries

A cartoon of a pig strapped to a backpack that it is about 10 times bigger than the pig
Source: braveandawake

In a few short weeks we will be taking our first few tentative steps on our way to Everest Base Camp in deepest, darkest Nepal. Or should that be, brightest, whitest Nepal?

The training regime is now rigorous and consistent (amazing what fear can do to motivation levels) and the waist line has been steadily shrinking.

Now it’s time to address the pile of gear that has been growing like a mushroom on the lounge room floor…

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What do you think?

Lost in Space Image featuring the robot and Will Robinson
Watch out Will Robinson! Source: Pinterest

Warning! Warning! Danger Will Robinson! (For all the Lost in Space fans out there.)

Navel gazing post ahead!

March 2020 will see me celebrating, perhaps acknowledging is a more appropriate word, my four year blog anniversary and it’s time for a little reflection, and hopefully some interaction/feedback from your good selves.

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Menindee – Exploring Small Towns in Remote New South Wales

Menindee? Where’s that? I hear you ask.

Head West out of Sydney. West over the Blue Mountains. West through Dubbo and past Cobar until you nearly drive into Wilcannia. So far you are a mere 960km from the Sydney Opera House.

Turn left on a dusty, bumpy dirt road and head south-west from Wilcannia and after about 160 dry, sandy kilometres, with any luck you will hit the tar again and be enjoying the bright lights of the thriving metropolis of Menindee. Population 551 (on a good day).

Your next question, “Why on Earth would you want to visit Menindee?

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Training for a Stroll to Everest Base Camp – Theory vs Practice

I am a fraud!

A cartoon of an overweight woman joggingI have these fantastic visions of me being a super-fit individual with a trim, taut physique, but needless to say there is a vast gap between imagining and reality. The pressure is on though as it is only a few short weeks before we will be donning the down jackets and trekking to Everest Base Camp deep in Nepal’s Himalayas.

I need to transform this middle-age spread into a more compact form and dramatically reduce the number of blubbery kilograms that I must haul up endless mountains.

Have I left it too late?

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Art Outside – Getting Out Amongst Walcha’s Sculptures

Sculpture in the open air gallery in WalchaIn the past I have shared a number of blog posts highlighting the growing trend of installing sculptures in every town, street, park or wherever you darn well please. I love that outdoor sculptures break down any barriers that may exist between art and the general public. Perhaps it is art by stealth? Who cares? It encourages anyone and everyone to interact with the pieces and instantly, everyone’s an expert!

There are few places in Australia that ‘do’ outside sculpture like the small rural New South Wales town of Walcha.

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Blog Chat…10 Questions for Stubbs at Stubbs Rambles On

Blogging feels like one big interconnected community and, as well as being a weekly blogger myself, I enjoy following other bloggers, reading their words and understanding their issues and journey.

Not all of the blogs I follow are travel blogs, but many of them are and each has their own unique ‘voice’ and take on what they are seeing and experiencing.

Here is the next instalment introducing you to some of my favourite blogs and sharing some of their blogging wisdom…

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On the Home Straight on the Camino Primitivo, 2020

The Camino Primitivo will be the last official section of my 2020 Spanish Camino adventure.

This Camino itinerary will be a bit like a burger ‘with the lot’ as it combines a number of paths – Caminos Madrid, Frances, San Salvador, Primitivo, Verde, del Norte and then a final stint of the Frances down into Santiago de Compostela on the last day. All combined in an effort to see new parts of Spain and to avoid the camino hordes.

Introducing…the Camino Primitivo

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In the Outback & Up to My Armpits in Art

Broken Hill is located around 1 150km west of Sydney and 520km from Adelaide and is officially in the middle of Nowhere! Despite its remote location, the city does have a fascinating history (which I will share in a later post) and its other huge selling point is the depth and diversity of artistic talent.

Here is a small taste of the 27 art galleries that can be found in, and around, Broken Hill.

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Hitting the Road to the Australian Outback

When I am traveling overseas and I tell people that I live in rural New South Wales, they immediately assume that I come from Outback Australia.

Not by a long shot!

This is what Outback Australia really looks like…

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The Camino Less Travelled in Spain – Camino San Salvador

Walk Eat Sleep RepeatThis post discusses the next main path I will be stepping out on when I head to Spain in May 2020.

First will be the Camino Madrid starting from Madrid and second will be the Camino San Salvador from Leon.

Here is what I have found out about this little travelled path.

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Blog Chat…10 Questions for The Travel Architect

Blogging feels like one big interconnected community and, as well as being a weekly blogger myself, I enjoy following other bloggers, reading their words and understanding their issues and journey.

Not all of the blogs I follow are travel blogs, but many of them are and each has their own unique ‘voice’ and take on what they are seeing and experiencing.

Over the next few months or so I will introduce you to some of my favourite blogs and share some of their blogging wisdom…

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Wauchope – Exploring Small Towns in Regional New South Wales

It’s time to get off the beaten track a little with a visit to Wauchope. Not that Wauchope is remote or hidden away, but this town definitely lives in the shadow of its much larger coastal neighbour, Port Macquarie.

Say hello to…Wauchope.

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On A Shopping Mission – Buying From the Bush in Walcha

I have rabbited on in some recent blogs about how the drought in Australia is crippling farmers and their surrounding communities. Some regions have not had any useful rain (more than a couple of millimetres) in over two years. Needless to say, like the dams and paddocks, farming income has completely dried up.

Often the face of the drought is a devastated farmer standing brokenhearted in a completely barren landscape. What many people don’t consider is the flow-on impact on the rural towns and the many small businesses that make up the fabric of these communities. When farmers have no money to spend, the cash flow also dries up for rural supply businesses, hairdressers, supermarkets and gift stores etc.

In an effort to support rural business, a social media campaign has kicked off to buy from the bush (#buyfromthebush, @buyfromthebush), encouraging everyone to source their Christmas gifts from retailers and producers located in rural, regional and remote Australia.

On a recent visit to the small New South Wales (NSW) town of Walcha, I rolled up my sleeves and made a concerted effort to inject a little bit of cash into the local shops.

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Camino Madrid 2020 – the Nuts & Bolts of walking in Spain

The Camino Madrid will be the first stage of my 2020 camino adventure. I am combining three main camino paths with a sprinkling of Camino Frances, Verde and del Norte for good measure, and then making it up a bit towards the end by going cross-country.

These plans always sound fabulous in theory, but it takes a fair dose of sweat and determination to find out how they work in practice. I will take each day as it comes and will be doing my best Doris Day impression as I ‘que sera sera’ through the Spanish countryside. A scary thought if you have heard me sing!

But, first things first, the Camino Madrid…

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Exploring My Backyard & Aboriginal Art – Hands on Rock, Mudgee

When I am on the road somewhere, it is easy to sit in the car and just drive. The concept of the ‘journey’ goes out the car window and the focus is on the destination at any cost.

For years I have been driving North from my home town, zipping through some scrubby, unattractive bush and straight past the turn off for the site of Hands on Rock. As the name indicates, there are hands and rock, but it is so much more than that. It is a stunning introduction to some classic Aboriginal art and culture right in my own backyard.

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What is your Gintelligence level?

For us southern hemisphere dwellers Spring is here and Summer is threatening just around the corner. As soon as the weather warms my thoughts go to lazy BBQs and outdoor dining, and something cool and refreshing in my hand.

When I saw the promotion for a local ‘Gintelligence’ class, I thought that this was definitely something I needed to learn more about. Who knew that getting educated could be so much fun?

With a fellow gin-lover by my side, we rolled up our sleeves and poured ourselves into the history of gin.

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Women can be adventurous too, even in the olden days…

Book Title: The Valley of the Assassins And Other Persian Travels

Author: Freya Stark

Front Cover of The Valley of Assassins book by Freya Stark
Source: penguinrandomhouse.com

Promotional Blurb: Hailed as a classic upon its first publication in 1934, The Valleys of the Assassins firmly established Freya Stark as one of her generation’s most intrepid explorers. The book chronicles her travels into Luristan, the mountainous terrain nestled between Iraq and present-day Iran, often with only a single guide and on a shoestring budget.

 Stark writes engagingly of the nomadic peoples who inhabit the region’s valleys and brings to life the stories of the ancient kingdoms of the Middle East, including that of the Lords of Alamut, a band of hashish-eating terrorists whose stronghold in the Elburz Mountains Stark was the first to document for the Royal Geographical Society.

 Her account is at once a highly readable travel narrative and a richly drawn, sympathetic portrait of a people told from their own compelling point of view. Source  Continue reading

Well, I’ll be off then…another Spanish Camino adventure

A bronze camino shellI promise you I resisted the urge for as long as I could and it beat me in the end!!

I have just booked my flights to Madrid, Spain and I am in hyper-excited mode and itching to pull my backpack on right NOW!

My patience levels are going to get a serious workout as I still have 211 sleeps before setting out on yet another +820km walk through Spain.

Here are the initial plans…

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Water, water every where, nor any drop to drink…

(With apologies to Samuel Taylor Coleridge)

Sunrise over the water at TuncurryAustralia is blessed with an abundance of beaches. I guess that comes with the territory as Australia would be the World’s largest island if we weren’t classified as a continent!

Many visitors to Australia make a bee line to Bondi or Manly beaches on Sydney’s outskirts or head straight to Queensland’s Gold Coast or further North to Cairns and the Barrier Reef. Yes, these are all very picturesque destinations, but they represent only a very small selection of the endless beach beauty that can be found all around our coastline.

To me, beaches are more than long stretches of sparkling white sand. They become magnets to walk, swim, sail, fish and be dazzled by all sorts of bird and sea life.

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Blog Chat…10 Questions for Maggie at Trepidatious Traveller – camino blog

Blogging feels like one big interconnected community and, as well as being a weekly blogger myself, I enjoy following other bloggers, reading their words and understanding their issues and journey

Not all of the blogs I follow are travel blogs, but many of them are and each has their own unique ‘voice’ and take on what they are seeing and experiencing.

Over the next 6 months or so I will introduce you to some of my favourite blogs and share some of their blogging wisdom…

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A Winter Wander in the Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney

Australian red ginger flower
Oops! I should have paid more attention! A type of ginger??

I like gardening, but it doesn’t like me much.

Where I live we are plagued by drought, strong winds, the kangaroos and wallabies eat everything, and the soil is more rock than dirt. I classify it as industrial strength gardening!

If I can’t grow a garden, I can appreciate the hard work of others and there are few better places to see that than in the Royal Botanic Gardens in the heart of Sydney.

And, it’s free!

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Exploring My Backyard – the Munghorn Gap Nature Reserve

Why is it that visitors often see more of your home town or region than the residents do?

Yes, we are not on holiday and are busy doing our day-to-day hustle, but that means we can easily miss the delights that exist in our own ‘backyard’.

Over the next few months I am going to attempt to rectify that by ‘wagging school’ ie. sneaking away from my office desk to explore a few local places that have long been on my one day list.

Introducing…the Munghorn Gap Nature Reserve.

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How did I not know about Kiama, South Coast NSW?

Growing up on a farm, when things were good and the seasons were kind, we would escape to the beach for a dose of salty sea air and sand between our toes. Invariably the road would take us North to the North Coast of New South Wales (NSW) or even further north into the glitz and bling of Queensland’s Gold Coast.

It is only now that I start to discover the gems I missed out on tucked away on the South Coast of NSW.

Introducing…Kiama.

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Escape Sydney’s Concrete Jungle on the Wulugul Walk!

If you are visiting Sydney and feel the need to escape the towering buildings and concrete jungle, then include this short stroll on your itinerary. It is sure to blast out the cobwebs with salty, sea air.

Introducing the Wulgul Walk…

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Is this the World’s Most Beautiful Bookstore?

Walking into Porto on the Camino Portuguese, I instantly fell in love with the city. A trip to the stunning Livraria Lello bookstore tipped me right over the edge.

It seems ridiculous to fall in love with a building and its content, but I did, and I encourage you to include this store on your itinerary if you are heading over to Portugal.

Introducing…Livraria Lello.

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Exploring the Sydney Coastline – Bondi to Manly Path – Stage 3

As the title says, this post describes the third section of the Bondi Beach to Manly route, this time from Rose Bay to Darling Point. As this stage was my third for the day, I actually cut it a bit short as after +25km, the ol’ legs were starting to protest.

Interested in more stunning views of Sydney and palatial homes?

Then read on…

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Lighting Up Sydney – Vivid 2019

Should I be embarrassed to admit that as a grown up, I still get excited by bright, colourful lights?

Well, I am not embarrassed AND I am among friends as over 2million people attend the Vivid Festival in Sydney, Australia every year.

At least this year I got to experience Vivid first hand rather than oohing and aahing at the TV (now that is embarrassing!).

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These Boots Were Made for Walkin’ – how to choose the right hiking footwear??

The first thing to get straight is that there is no such thing as the perfect footwear!

Choosing hiking/walking footwear is so individual that you really need to ignore 50% of what people tell you and choose the footwear that suits you best.

Now we have that out of the road, here are my tips and tricks, and you can ignore me too!

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Exploring the Sydney Coastline – Bondi to Manly Path – Stage 2

As the title says, this post describes the second stage of the Bondi to Manly Coastal Path, this time from Watsons Bay to Rose Bay. Of the three stages I completed on a sparkling June day, this was my favourite.

For background on this 80km path and to start from the ‘beginning’ check out my post about Stage 1.

Here are my thoughts and comments on Stage 2.

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Un-favourite Places

This could be a short post!

By now you may have gathered that I am happy to travel anywhere, anytime.  I reckon I could pack for an international trip in less than ten minutes and not leave anything important behind.

As I am always rabbiting on about all the wonderful places I go and experiences I enjoy, I thought I would challenge myself to write a post discussing places I would NOT return to or travel to in the first place…

Hmmm, now that is quite a task!

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Getting some culcha! The Archibald Prize for Portrait Painting

Trips to Sydney, colloquially referred to as The Big Smoke, are few and far between for me these days. When I do undertake the four-hour drive it is often a fleeting, overnight trip and I am more than ready to make my escape back to the bush.

This changed in early June when I had an opportunity to spend four days just playing tourist. What a luxury and novelty. One of the things on my bucket list was a visit to the Archibald Prize for Portrait Painting at the Art Gallery of NSW in Sydney.

I’m no artist, but I do enjoy opening my eyes and mind to new and creative things.

The Archibald Prize does that in spades!

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Exploring the Sydney Coastline – Bondi to Manly Path – Stage 1

There is no better way to explore a city than on two feet. It gets even better when it is a sparkling Winter’s day and you have no time pressure to do anything other than stroll in the sunshine.

Welcome to the Bondi to Manly Walk.

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Top Tips for the Beginner Blogger

March 2019 saw me notch up my three year blogging anniversary. Yes, that is long time to be sending my waffly words out into the ether, but it has also been an interesting, challenging and rewarding experience from this side of the computer.

If you are thinking about getting into the Blogosphere, here are a few tips and tricks that I have learned along the way…

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What you can achieve when you believe you can…

Book Title: Eight Feet in the Andes: Travels with a Mule in Unknown Peru

Author: Dervla Murphy

Book Cover - Eight Feet in the Andes
Source: goodreads.com

Promotional Blurb: The eight feet belong to Dervla Murphy, her nine-year-old daughter Rachel and Juana, an elegant mule, who together clambered the length of Peru, from Cajamarca near the border with Ecuador, to Cuzco, the ancient Inca capital, over 1300 miles to the south. 

With only the most basic necessities to sustain them and spending most of their time above 10,000 feet, their journey was marked by extreme discomfort, occasional danger and even the temporary loss of Juana over a precipice. Yet mother and daughter, a formidable duo, were unflagging in their sympathetic response to the perilous beauty and impoverished people of the Andes.

In this extraordinary adventure, Dervla Murphy is at her intrepid best, facing up to the terrors, horrors and joys of her journey along the mountain pathsSource

My Thoughts:  To date, I have not travelled anywhere in South America and have read very little about this continent. Spotting this book in a second hand bookstore was the perfect opportunity to remedy this situation. The fact that the book was about a walking adventure made it even more appealing!

This is an eye-opening read. Their bravery or downright foolhardiness is as breathtaking as the scenery they scramble through. I do not know if I am more in awe of Dervla for her unquestioning belief that walking 1300 miles through the Andes is an interesting and enjoyable way to spend ten weeks of your life OR her daughter Rachel who merrily and uncomplainingly traipsed along after her mother. The adventurous spirit must be a genetic thing and I suspect you could count on one hand the number of other nine year olds in the World who would willingly follow a parent through such terrain and under such conditions.

Murphy is quoted as saying, “the hardships and poverty of my youth had been a good apprenticeship for this form of travel. I had been brought up to understand that material possessions and physical comfort should never be confused with success, achievement and security”. Wise words.

Amidst all the blood, sweat and tears, Murphy waxes lyrical about the breathtaking natural scenery and at times, struggles to find enough superlatives to describe what she is seeing. Luckily for the reader she knows to check herself and balances much of the floral prose with snippets of historical information as they follow the path of the early Spanish conquistadores.

A really enjoyable read that is a good mix of adventure, stunning landscape, human mishaps, history and reflections about colonial invasion. I gave it 8/10.

Dervla Murphy
Source: bbc.co.uk

Author bio: Dervla Murphy was born on 28 November 1931 of parents whose families were both settled in Dublin as far back as can be traced.  Her grandfather and most of his family were involved in the Irish Republican movement.  Her father was appointed Waterford County Librarian in 1930 after three years internment in Wormwood Scrubs prison and seven years at the Sorbonne.  Her mother was invalided by arthritis when Dervla was one year old.

She was educated at the Ursuline Convent in Waterford until she was fourteen, when, because of the wartime shortage of servants, she left to keep house for her father and to nurse her mother.  Dervla did this for sixteen years with occasional breaks bicycling on the Continent.

Her mother’s death left her free to go farther afield and in 1963 she cycled to India.  There she worked with Tibetan refugee children before returning home after a year to write her first two books.

Dervla Murphy’s first book, Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle, was published in 1965. Over 20 other titles have followed. Dervla has won worldwide praise for her writing and has been described as a ‘travel legend’ and ‘the first lady of Irish cycling’. Now in her 80s, she continues to travel around the world and remains passionate about politics, conservation, bicycling and beer. Source

Author blog or website: not found

Pages:  320

Published: First edition, 1983

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton General Division

Available from: Book Depository (from $14.)

#travelinspo #armchairtravel #armchairadventure

Pretending to be Nomads in the Thar Desert

The light was starting to soften and the breeze picked up as we zipped up our jackets and tucked in our scarves. Although Summer was just around the corner, it was still definitely wintery as we strode across the ochre sand of the Thar Desert.

We had driven about 40km further west out of Jaisalmer, and 40km closer to Pakistan, to enjoy a night in a ‘luxury’ desert camp and the obligatory sunset camel ride. This was all part of our Webjet package tour and would prove to be one of the more memorable activities during our visit to India.

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Top Tips for the Beginner Long Distance Walker

You know, it’s not such a quantum leap from being a walk-for-health-and-enjoyment walker to becoming a let’s-walk-900km walker! You simply do the same things day after day, as you slowly move from point A to B.

Perhaps the biggest challenge is the required change in mindset and here are some tips to help you develop the confidence to step out and step up to a big walking adventure…

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Cooking Up a Storm in India

I hate cooking!

Well, I don’t hate cooking, but if I had the option I would prefer to watch paint dry than have to think about ‘what’s for dinner’. So, it was with no little trepidation that I voluntarily agreed to participate in an Indian cooking class.

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The Lows & Lows of International Travel

I believe that you need to be a committed optimist to truly enjoy international travel. If you stopped and thought about all the things that could possibly go wrong as soon as you step outside your front door, you would never leave home.

On the other hand, perhaps we need the occasional travel disaster to make us appreciate all the fabulous things about setting out on an international adventure. Continue reading

Airline Review – Singapore Airlines

Flying is stressful!

As much as I get excited about each and every trip, there is always that feeling of controlled chaos at the airport check-in and the bun-rush to get the ‘best’ seat, and get rid of your luggage.

It couldn’t have been more different with Singapore Airlines.

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The Power of Hindsight – Via Francigena Reflections

Last year I took on the biggest physical challenge of my life – the Italian leg of the Via Francigena pilgrimage trail. Over a period of 40 days, I covered 1 046.9km (yes, that 0.9km is very important) and there were many days when I really questioned my sanity!

However, now that seven months have passed and, I imagine a little like the pain of childbirth the hard times have faded, I may be able to assess the whole thing a little more objectively… Continue reading

A Night at the Opera…House, Sydney

Those graceful white sails are instantly recognisable. They soar away from the city and out towards the harbour, floating above the home of quality Australian music and performance.

There was a happy buzz around Circular Quay as we strolled towards the Sydney Opera House. The young and groovy were just starting to come out to play and international visitors were surging to see the iconic scenery lit up at night.

Us? We were about to experience some world-class jazz.

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Is it Still Possible to be this Adventurous?

Book Title: On The Trail of Genghis Khan – An Epic Journey Through the Land of the Nomads

Author: Tim Cope

The cover of the Tim Cope book - on the Trail of Genghis KhanPromotional Blurb:  The relationship between man and horse on the Eurasian steppe gave rise to a succession of rich nomadic cultures. Among them were the Mongols of the thirteenth century – a small tribe, which, under the charismatic leadership of Genghis Khan, created the largest contiguous land empire in history. Inspired by the extraordinary life nomads still lead today, Tim Cope embarked on a journey that hadn’t been successfully completed since those times: to travel on horseback across the entire length of the Eurasian steppe, from Karakorum, the ancient capital of Mongolia, through Kazakhstan, Russia, Crimea and the Ukraine to the Danube River in Hungary. 

From horse-riding novice to travelling three years and 10 000 kilometres on horseback, accompanied by his dog Tigon, Tim learnt to fend off wolves and would-be horse-thieves, and grapple with the extremes of the steppe as he crossed sub-zero plateaus, the scorching deserts of Kazakhstan and the high-mountain passes of the Carpathians. Along the way, he was taken in by people who taught him the traditional ways and told him their recent history: Stalin’s push for industrialisation brought calamity to the steepe and forced collectivism that in Kazakhstan alone led to the loss of several million livestock and the starvation of more than a million nomads. Today Cope bears witness to how the traditional ways hang precariously in the balance in the post-Soviet world. Source

My Thoughts:  I had heard about this book many, many years ago and it sat in my To Be Read pile for the same amount of years. I had to get my mind ready for an epic journey – ready to tackle an adventure of this size and scale.

This IS an adventure to beat ALL adventures!

Throughout the book I was boggled by Cope’s ability to withstand the searing or freezing temperatures, the constant threats to personal safety and his ability to survive on a diet heavily laced with camel’s head and pig fat, and all washed down with a never-ending stream of vodka.

I like to think I am a fairly adventurous soul, but I am positively pedestrian when compared to Cope. His journey from Mongolia to Hungary was an exercise in pure resilience. I was blown away by Cope’s passion for the journey and the history of the regions he passed through and its people, and his sheer stamina to do it day after day even under constant threat to his safety.

Cope’s passion for adventure is balanced by his love of history and his book is littered with background information on the Mongols, Cossacks, Russians and Tatars. It was the impact of the Russians which really opened my eyes. Their systematic programme of ethnic cleansing all but wiped out the individual cultures and replaced it with bland and severe Soviet architecture, social and political systems, Russian language and a seemingly limitless stream of vodka. It has just broken the identity of so many countries and it makes me wonder if they will ever recover. Amidst all the desolation and cultural devastation there were small pockets of resistance and I hope they can find a foothold and eventually blossom.

I must admit that I did lose track of some of the history and it all got a bit confusing at times, but that is more of a comment about me than Cope’s writing.

Another thing I have been wondering is whether this sort of adventure is still possible today. We live in such an incredibly connected world these days, is it possible to truly go ‘off grid’ like Cope did?

Also, with so much political tension in the World, would it be possible to move from country to country like Cope did, although I acknowledge that this was not straight forward for him either 15 years ago.

It has certainly tweaked my interest to travel to some of these little known countries.

If you like an adventurous read that makes you think AND opens your eyes to both history and ancient cultures, then make sure you track down a copy of Cope’s epic.

A head and shoulders photo of Tim Cope
Tim Cope. Source: abc.net.au

Author bio: Born in 1978, Tim Cope, F.R.G.S., is an award-winning adventurer, author and film-maker with a special interest in the traditional cultures of Central Asia and Russia. He has studied as a wilderness guide in the Finnish and Russian subarctic, ridden a bicycle across Russia to China, and rowed a boat along the Yenisey River through Siberia to the Arctic Ocean. Tim’s most renowned journey was a three year journey by horse from Mongolia to Hungary on the trail of Genghis Khan. He is also the creator of several documentary films, including the award winning series “The Trail of Genghis Khan,” (commissioned by ABC Australia and ZDF/Arte in Europe). Tim lives in Victoria, Australia, and annually guides trekking journeys to remote western Mongolia for World Expeditions. Source

Author blog or website: http://www.timcopejourneys.com/

Pages:  525

Published: 2014

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Available from: Book Depository (from $17.86)

Don’t Miss Sydney’s Stupendous Coastal Walk!

The Opera House, the Harbour Bridge, and the Rocks. These are the most popular and heavily promoted tourist attractions in Sydney.

But Sydney’s natural environment is as equally impressive, especially the spectacular Coastal Walk from world-famous Bondi Beach all the way to party-central, Coogee Beach.

Here’s why you shouldn’t miss it…

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Webjet Deals – Are They Too Good To Be True?

You may have seen the print and other ads for the Webjet tour business and wondered if they were too good to be true. The prices seem incredibly low and chockful of meals, entrance tickets and other add-ons, making you wonder, ‘how can they do it’?

Well, they can AND it is well worth doing…

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A Must-See by the Sea!

The stars don’t always align, but if you can schedule your visit to Sydney to coincide with the annual Sculpture by the Sea exhibition, then do it!

Held in October each year for around three weeks, Sculpture by the Sea stretching from the iconic Bondi Beach to secluded Tamarama Beach is an event not to be missed.

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Spanish Camino or Italian Via Francigena – which one is for you?

Since 2013 I have walked three caminos, all concluding at Santiago de Compostela in north-west Spain. The ever-popular Camino Frances was my introduction to the wonderful world of long distance walking. Bitten by the bug, I returned to Spain for the Via de la Plata from Seville in 2014 and then stepped out on my own on the Camino Portuguese from Lisbon in 2016.

With all those caminos under my belt I thought it was time to break out of Spain (J) and, for something different, last year I walked 1046.9km through Italy on the Via Francigena.

But what is the difference between the two? And which is the right one for you? Continue reading

India Steals Our Hearts

The Indian adventure continues…

Each day brings exciting, and sometimes challenging, new sights, sounds and smells.

We are now down in southern Rajasthan at the romantic white city, Udaipur. In the last week we have:
• been stunned by the living city inside the Jaisalmer Fort,
• ridden camels across the sand dunes of the Thar Desert and walked bow-legged for a while afterwards!😉
• listened to soothing chakra music in the imposing Mehrangarh Fort and
• stood amused and confused in the colourful chaos of the old Jodhpur bazaar.
• bumped and jiggled and rattled over the back roads to soaring Jain temples,
• edged slowly through, joyous singing and dancing weddings and
• had more selfie photos taken than I have had hot dinners!
• Laughed at the traffic and the ability to fit a complete car chassis in the back of a small tuk tuk,
• Visited a small desert school to drop off some school supplies. The children stared at us as if we had dropped in from out of space, but hopefully the pens and pencils will be useful.
• Stared open mouthed at the opulence of the City Palace in Udaipur, and
• Watched the golden walls of the Palace glow at sunset as we bobbed around Lake Pichola.

What an amazing country!

Rolling Through Rajasthan, India

We are not in Kansas anymore, Toto!

More accurately, we are not in little ol’ Mudgee anymore. Instead we are in a car driving through the depths of dusty Rajasthan, India.

Today will be day five of our Opulence of Rajasthan tour and I am struggling to put into words all that we have seen. India is such a land of contrasts – from gobsmacking beauty to heartbreaking sadness, and always an eye opener.

Our little traveling party of three women, and our patient driver, left New Delhi on Monday. We have been working our way eastwards and arrived in Jaisalmer yesterday afternoon. As we have travelled, the terrain has become increasingly desolate and now we are well and truly on the outskirts of the Thar Desert. To the point where this afternoon our plan is to pull on our johdpurs, mount up and head off on our camels out over the sand dunes.

In the meantime I will try to share a little of what we have seen so far. Even in the middle of nowhere there is something to look at, even if it just the crazy traffic.

Asif, our driver, is great company and is happy answer all our crazy questions and sometimes even he has his camera out taking photos too!

Enjoy the snaps below. I will try to be a better blogger over the next couple of weeks, but no guarantees!

Chandi Cowl market in Old Delhi

Through the streets of Jaisalmer

Sunset over Jaisalmer

Views from the car

Making new friends at Ramdevra Hindu Temple

The inhospitable countryside as we edge closer to the Thar Desert

Happy pilgrims on their way to Ramdevra

Transport in India!!

Thousands of rats at Rat temple at Phalodi

A rubbish mountain (the photo really doesn’t show its true size) at Bikaner

Beautifully painted houses at Mandawa

One of our hotels…

Road conditions are a little basic in places..

Piacenza – another hidden Italian gem

One of the main things I enjoy about walking pilgrim trails is that often the trails lead me through all manner of remote countryside and many small towns and villages that would not normally be on a tourist’s agenda.

Piacenza, in northern Italy, is one of those gems which reward a curious visitor as well as an exhausted hiker, and truly hum with the energy of local life.

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Getting Arty on the Streets of Italy

There really are some clever people in the World.

Unfortunately I am not one of them, especially when it comes to anything remotely artistic or creative. I am strictly a stick figure artist and even then you have to use a fair bit of imagination to see what I am getting at, but I do love to see the magical creations of others.

On a recent stroll through many Italian towns and cities, I was spoilt for creative choice

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48 Hours in downtown Mudgee

I know I am terribly biased, but I love my home town of Mudgee. Yes, it is only small and, Yes, it is a solid three and a half or four hour drive from Sydney, but when you get here it is a feast for the senses, especially the tastebuds.

We have around 40 wineries, breweries and distilleries in the countryside surrounding the town, however in this post I am encouraging you to park the car, pocket the keys and explore Mudgee itself. Being small, everything is in easy walking distance.

So, here is an easy 48 hour plan of attack… Continue reading

Being Uber-Cool in Italy

Book Title: Vroom with A View

Author: Peter Moore

Vroom with A View Book Cover
Source: Book Depository

Promotional Blurb: It was the late night Tai Bo fitness commercial warning him that life comes to an end after 40 that prompted Peter Moore to chase a boyhood dream. To go to Italy and seek out its celebrated dolce vita from the back of a Vespa. 

But it couldn’t be just any old Vespa. Peter wanted a bike as old as he was and in the same sort of condition: a little rough round the edges, a bit slow in the mornings perhaps, but basically still OK. And it had to have saddle seats. And temperamental electrics. And a little too much chrome. The sort of scooter you’d imagine a sharp-suited, Ray Ban-wearing young Marcello Mastroianni riding. Her name was Sophia. 

From picnicking in the Italian alps and rattling through cobbled hilltop to gate-crashing Frances Mayes’s villa and re-enacting ‘Roman Holiday’, Vroom with a View is as much a romance as a travel adventure. For not only does Peter win the woman of his dreams, he falls for a side of Italy others rarely see. Along with Sophia, of course… Source: Book Depository

My Thoughts:  This is a wonderful, quirky travel read, especially enjoyable for those of us with a soft spot for all things Italian.

It really resonated with me so soon after my return from my latest walk, this time in Italy. I was pleased to see he traveled to a few of the same places that I visited. He even mentioned the Via Francigena a couple of times and I do admit to often looking longingly at Vespas and other small motor bikes. How much easier and quicker would it have been to jump on one of those machines, even an old one like Sophia, and putter up some of the %$#@! hills?

He has a very easy and entertaining style. His voice is informal and relaxed, but interesting at the same time. He has a good eye and ear, and captures the sights, smells and sounds of Italy. Most importantly, he captures the warmth of the Italian people.

Author Peter Moore
Peter Moore

Author bio: Peter is an author who writes about travel. He is always searching for places that are authentic and a little bit different. No floaty sundresses or hipster beards here. Born in Sydney. Living in London. Author of six best-selling travel narratives. Travelled through 105 countries. Always looking for the next dodgy lane to wander down. Source

 Author blog or website: http://www.petermoore.net

Pages:  352

Published: 2003

Publisher: Bantam

Available from: Book Depository (from $17.86)

Vercelli – a hidden gem of Italy

It must be a wee bit frustrating being a small town or city in Italy, struggling to share the limelight with heavy-hitters such as Rome, Naples, Florence and Venice. No amount of marketing budget will ever be enough to compete with their tourism profile and yet there are so many smaller, magical places with great stories to tell.

So, here is a small promotion for the city of Vercelli…

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Top Tips for Walking the Italian Via Francigena

Having packed away the hiking boots and washed all my incredibly grotty hiking clothes that could possibly have walked home on their own, I thought it might be timely to share some key learnings from my latest long distance walk through Italy.

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Expecting the Unexpected in Italy

The greatest joy of travel are those moments when you go, ‘Huh? I didn’t expect that’. On a recent stroll through Italy I was constantly surprised and my expectations and assumptions regularly challenged.

Perhaps this is more of a reflection of my own ignorance and biases, and this is what I found… Continue reading

Going to the Dogs in Switzerland

When we think of Switzerland we naturally picture soaring snow-capped mountains, lush green fields, cows with cowbells, chocolate, watches and possibly, St Bernard dogs with their trusty brandy barrels fastened below their chins.

But did you know that the dogs have been named after their home? The Great Saint Bernard Pass.

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The Italian Via Francigena – the Nuts and Bolts

Freshly home from the Italian section of the Via Francigena, I thought it might be timely to share the nuts and bolts of this pilgrimage route with those who may be considering a similar stroll.

It certainly was much harder than I expected, but it was amazing on a daily basis.

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Pre-Walk – Don’t Worry, Be Happy

I would love to be one of those laid back, chilled out individuals.

One of those people who seem to cruise through life and things seem to effortlessly fall into place.

But, No. That’s just not me…

I am a planner, an organiser, and I try to cover every eventuality. This goes into overdrive when I am planning a long walk, but now that I have completed my fourth long distance stroll, I have finally identified the top five things I DON’T need to worry about. Continue reading

The Top Ten Items I Never Travel Without

I suspect that there is little in this world more subject to personal preferences than what gets packed for an overseas or extended trip. Our individual sense of ‘priority’ is as precisely different as we are.

About now, I suspect a whole bunch of my friends are rolling their eyes as our all-too-infrequent weekends away together, highlight our contrasting packing styles. Me with my small, light, carry-on-style suitcase….and their steamer trunks!

Anyway, here are my top ten bare necessities… Continue reading

Day 40 – FINAL DAY – Via Francigena, La Storta to Roma, 21.2km

Date: Thursday 20 September
Distance covered to Rome: 1046.9km
Terrain: busy roads, forest paths, busy streets
Overnight: Barbineri Luxury Rooms (a very generous description), €72
Feeling: happy and amazed!

When I woke up this morning I could hear the swish of car tyres on the roadway which indicated one thing and one thing only. Rain! It was a bit disappointing, but we weren’t going to let it stop us striding into Rome and doing a happy dance in St Peter’s Square.

Before that we still had a few kilometres to cover and all of them in the drizzle. It was that annoying sort of rain – enough to wet you, but not enough to make you put a rain jacket on. In those situations you are often wetter and hotter in the rain coat than in the rain.

I tried to be an optimist and wish the rain away and eventually, with 5km to go, it worked. We managed to get some hazy photos from Monte Moro and then the real thing in the Square itself.

To be honest I am feeling a bit numb at the moment. I can’t believe I am here and I did it! There were days when I really thought I had bitten off more than I could chew, but I guess you just have to keep putting one foot in front of the other until you reach your goal. How’s that for some mixed metaphors??

Thanks for all your comments, likes and support. It was truly appreciated!

Tip of the day: it is always beer o’clock somewhere in the World!

Hmmmm, now where to next????

(Sorry for the delay in posting. More internet issues!)

Day 39 Via Francigena, Campagnano di Roma to La Storta, 24.7km

Date: Wednesday 19 September
Distance covered to Rome: 1025.7/1027km
Terrain: not what I expected.
Overnight: Hotel Cassia, €55 (Double)
Feeling: excited and amazed that I am almost in Rome.

Today wasn’t what I expected at all. I was thinking that, because we are so close to Rome, we would be subjected to endless industrial estates, road walking and monotonous traffic. Instead I was pleasantly surprised with lots of paddocks, sheep, even more babbling brooks and Etruscan ruins.

The weather forecast for today was rain from 900am so we got an early start in the hope of getting as many kilometres done before the rain set in. Our luck held although it was very humid and sticky and the sweat just poured out of us. Perhaps they should promote this walk as a cleansing process as the pores really get a work out.

A highlight of the day was to see quite a few mobs of sheep being closely guarded by their Maremma dogs. The dogs are so calm and gentle, but I am assuming that would change quickly if the flock was threatened.

You may be thinking, from the distance figure above, that tomorrow I am going to overshoot Rome and start heading south. When I did my original planning I searched the internet for as much information as possible about each stage/leg and selected the longest distance for each stage to develop a ‘worst case scenario’ overall distance. Even with all that, it seems I have underestimated the distance, but what’s 20km between friends?

Here’s to tomorrow!!

Tip of the day: Hang in there! You can do it!

Day 38 Via Francigena, Sutri to Campagnano di Roma, 26.2km

Date: Tuesday 18 September
Distance covered to Rome: 1001/1027km
Terrain: flattish farms and countryside climbs.
Overnight: Centro Parrocchiale, €10 (Donativo)
Feeling: happy to be inside out of the storm.

We survived the festival last night and managed to get some sleep despite the fireworks. We all agreed that the fireworks were more like massive explosions rather than the normal ooh-ahhh fireworks we experience in Australia. The pyrotechnics were showcased at a Roman amphitheatre. I can’t help but wonder about the impact of all that detonation on the ancient structure. It would certainly have shaken the dust out of the rafters!

We have decided that this part of the world is in the commuter belt to Rome. Even at an early hour the roads were super-busy and people seemed to be carpooling to get to work. Thankfully we weren’t on the roads much today and we could stay well out of their way.

The path does seem to be getting busier though and last night we met seven Americans who are just walking the last 100km with baggage transport and hotel accommodation only. Each to their own and perhaps they are way smarter than me!

Olive groves, hazelnut trees of all different ages and stages, and immaculate golf courses that were being pedantically groomed. Eucalyptus trees to remind me of home, gurgling streams and dashing waterfalls, and angry dogs to ensure I don’t get too comfortable.

And then there was the marijuana! Well, I am not an expert by any means, but it looked like a carefully cultivated crop, complete with irrirrigation. Perhaps it was hemp instead? I have noticed in a few towns there are ‘Weed’ shops. Perhaps it is legal in Italy or it is for medicinal purposes only? Or maybe they just don’t inhale?

Tip of the day: If you are walking strongly at this stage of the game, consider combining some of these last days to reduce the number to two or three stages. Accommodation seems to be more plentiful, but so are the number of walkers.